They don't make them like they used to (2)

(More from my collection of old Singer sewing machines)

Fast forward 26 years to the next machine in my collection. I bought this one to fill the early 20th century gap. I already had one from the 1880s, the 1920s and 30s and a couple of post war models.So I thought I should really have one from this era too. 

 Singer 28 k. Hand cranked sewing machine from Helen Poremba's studio

A hand cranked model 28 K, first introduced by Singer in 1886. This one was made some time between January and June in the year 1907, in Kilbowie, Scotland.

The 28 K was one of the first Singer machines which could be fitted with a motor. Initially they were hand cranked, or belt driven with a treadle, but later models also had fixing points for a motor.  (The start of a whole new era for the sewing machine.)

 Singer 28 k. Oscillating shuttle

The boat shuttle in this model swings backwards and forwards from one pivot point. This is the oscillating (or vibrating) shuttle, which replaced the transverse shuttle used in earlier models. The oscillating shuttle was smoother, required less mechanical moving parts, it was therefore quieter, and could stitch faster.

 

 

 Singer 28 k. Bobbin winding mechanism

Another design modification was the winding mechanism for the bobbin on the 28 k. It is situated low down, near the base of the machine and is driven directly from the rim of the drive wheel. Unlike the model 12, this one has a clever little device which holds and directs the thread while it winds, so that the bobbin fills evenly. I love that you can see just how this mechanism works. Clever and beautifully simple.

 

 Singer 28 k. Coffin lid wooden box

It also has a lovely wooden box to house the machine. This style of box was known as the ‘coffin lid’ case.

(At one time the Kilbowie factory, where this machine was made, employed 2,000 cabinet makers to make the boxes and bases for the machines.)

To find out all sorts of stuff about Singer and sewing machines, the Sewalot website is full of interesting information.  www.sewalot.com